Jul 062014
 

Picture: Dougal Paterson, www.dougalpaterson.com

Up until now, if you wanted to build one of our hollow wood surfboards you needed to sign up for a week-long course. For many people who would like the experience of building their own board, it’s hard to take a full week.

The six-day course is still available. But we have also added a three-day hollow wood surfboard building course where all it takes is a Friday, Saturday and Sunday for you to experience building your own wood surfboard.

We’ll still retain the core of our week-long course offering and you’ll experience the satisfaction of working with wood in crafting your own beautiful, functional wave craft.

But instead of starting at the beginning, part of your board will already be built for you when you begin, enabling you to come in and work on the most crucial and rewarding parts.

The first three-day course will run 19-21 September 2014. To book your spot, contact Patrick through burnett.patrick@gmail.com or 073 232 3043 to sign up or for more information.

What you get:

– Your own beautiful, surfable wood surfboard, handmade by yourself

– Access to all tools and provision of materials needed to make your surfboard

– Information on wood surfboards, history, design dynamics, environmental credentials

– Tuition and assistance

– Glassing and finishing of the board

– Fin boxes or handmade wood fins

– Tea/Coffee throughout the day

– Lunch on the days that you build

– Experience of working with wood and craft in a stunning rural environment

– The chance to meet other like-minded folk also building their own boards.

To see our picture gallery of people who have built their own boards, click here. For more information, click here.

Contact Patrick through burnett.patrick@gmail.com or 073 232 3043 to sign up or for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan 302014
 

In January, a clip about Burnett Wood Surfboards aired on Dagbreek, the Afrikaans language breakfast show on DSTV. There are some great shots of our workshop on Imhoff Farm in Kommetjie, an interview about the green credentials of wood surfboards, another interview with one of our course participants and some Go-Pro footage at the end. Many, many thanks to Martin Giselsson and Patrick Young for participating. The board in the Go-Pro footage was made by Patrick Young on the very first hollow wood surfboard workshop held by Burnett Wood Surfboards. Enjoy!

Dec 282013
 

Twenty-five guys and one lady built their own hollow wood surfboards with Burnett Wood Surfboards in 2013. Check out the photo gallery below to see some of the beautiful boards that were made. 2014 will bring a new batch of graduates.

In 2014 we’ll be offering three options for those who want to build their own hollow wood surfboard on our wood surfboard course. Firstly, in our one-on-one building sessions, you contact us and tell us when you want to come into our workshop and build your board. Anytime that suits you and we’ll make it happen.

Secondly, you can join a group course during the scheduled dates listed below. Numbers are limited to four per course.

Lastly, we will be running regular Saturday workshops. It takes 5-6  Saturday’s to build a board. Contact us for more information.

Those participating walk away with their own handcrafted and very beautiful hollow wood surfboard. Our courses take place at the picturesque Imhoff Farm Village in Kommetjie, Cape Town, minutes away from a number of surfing spots. More information is available on our courses page.

UPCOMING FULL TIME COURSES FOR 2014

  • 17-22 March 2014
  • 14-19 April 2014
  • 11-17 August 2014
  • 8-13 December 2014

Course Pictures and Boards

[img src=http://burnettwoodsurfboards.co.za/wp-content/flagallery/course-pictures/thumbs/thumbs_danyalfish2.jpg]30340DCIM100GOPROGOPR3375.
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Aug 282012
 

blackpinlongboardbottomblackpinlongboarddeckFOR SALE: 9′.6″ hollow wood longboard. Western Red Cedar, Poplar, Japanese Cedar, Redwood, Obeche. 8″ retro pivot bamboo fin. Email us for more info.

Jan 162010
 

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/9934028[/vimeo]Up for the dawnie this morning. Started out on the Oregon pine fish in some 4-5 foot conditions, then onto a 6.5 Oregon and Saligna single fin and finally finished up on a 7.8 Obeche and redwood mini-malibu. About five hours in the water and great to surf the different boards and appreciate the different way they respond to conditions.

The fish is of course super fast – it’s amazing how it cruises around the sections. The single fin lovely and stable on the take off and drop and great to lock into the pocket on. A six-foot pointbreak and it’ll be a dream. And the mini-malibu, as my mate Byron calls it, the grand ‘ol daddy. But it sure is fun dropping into a ledgy 4-5 ft wave on a mini-malibu and then getting the rail in the face and cruising down the line.I’m definitely starting to appreciate the skill involved in walking a board and keeping it in the energy pocket of the wave for the duration of the ride.

When it comes to making boards, all of this got me thinking about the balance between speed and control when it comes to short boards and how this applies to different waves. The fish for example is super fast and it will generate momentum even in the smallest of waves, but sometimes you feel like you almost want more control ‘cos you are often past a tube section before you even knew it was there. On the single fin, with its thin tail, there’s a lot more control, but it doesn’t have the playfulness of a fish. It’s definitely a horses for courses kind of situation, to use an old cliche. More speed, less control. More control, less speed. So at least some of the process of making boards is about understanding that balance and then crafting a relationship between these two elements, speed and control.

Nov 112009
 

Here’s an unglassed version of the single fin I’ve just finished.

It’s looking good. All that remains is too tweak the rails and add a pin line. Many thanks to my friend Byron Loker who did some hard yards on sanding the deck, bottom and rails. He has done a great job, with a fine eye for the detail.

The interesting thing about this board is that the inside skeleton is made from old foam. The wood is Oregon pine cut from an old door frame and locally-grown Saligna Gum that I had lying around from the first board I made back in the beginning of 2008.

Photo: Byron Loker. I like the composure and the colours.

Oct 012009
 

The latest board on the table in the workshop is a 6.0 single fin, thick in the top third, narrowing to a pin tail. It’s coming together quickly because I’ve had a lot of time the last week and I’m hoping to have it ready for sanding by the weekend.

The board pictured here is the second board I made, dating back to early 2008. The one I’m making now is based on similar dimensions, but represents the fourth generation of the model.

There’s an interesting variation on this one, which is an experiment using recycled foam to build the inside framework. So far it’s going okay, but it is a bit of an experiment and I’m making it up as I go along. What I have noticed is that foam isn’t that strong under clamping so you have to be careful not to crush it.

For the rest of it, I’m using recycled pieces of Oregon pine mixed with some old planks of locally-grown South African Saligna gum. I wasn’t sure how the two varieties would match up, but seeing them together I think the board is going to look stunning. Can’t wait to get it in the water, although this one is going to a friend. It’s going to be hard to give away, but hopefully he’ll let me surf it.

Photo: Byron Loker

The latest board on the table in the workshop is a 6.0 single fin, thick in the top third, narrowing to a pin tail. It’s coming together quickly because I’ve had a lot of time the last week and I’m hoping to have it ready for sanding by the weekend. Gonna call this one Ndawu Yama Phupa, which is Xhosa for Place of Dreaming and is a lesser known name for Supertubes at Jeffrey’s Bay. Reckon the shape of this board is made for Supers.The board pictured here is the second board I made, dating back to early 2008. The one I’m making now is based on similar dimensions, but represents the fourth generation of the model.There’s an interesting variation on this one, which is an experiment using recycled foam to build the inside framework. So far it’s going okay, but it is a bit of an experiment and I’m making it up as I go along. What I have noticed is that foam isn’t that strong under clamping so you have to be careful not to crush it.

For the rest of it, I’m using recycled pieces of Oregon pine mixed with some old planks of locally-grown South African Saligna gum. I wasn’t sure how the two varieties would match up, but seeing them together I think the board is going to look stunning. Can’t wait to get it in the water, although this one is going to a friend. It’s going to be hard to give away, but hopefully he’ll let me surf it.

Photo: Byron LokerPlace of

Sep 182009
 

Wood is such a beautiful medium to work with. So far I’ve experimented with Saligna gum, Meranti, Obeche and Jelutong, but this 5.9 fish made out of Oregon pine is in my opinion by far the most beautiful. Part of the reason why its been so satisfying to make this board is that it is 100% recycled wood – all the Oregon on this board came from old pieces of floorboard and in parts you can still see the holes were the nails were. I think its awesome to take something old and turn it into something beautiful – and the bonus is that the board really surfs well.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the best type of wood to use in making surfboards. It seems to me the two main factors that you want to consider is weight, although the technique you use for building the boards can allow you to experiment with different varieties; flexibility in that this has performance implications and you don’t want to be working with wood that is too brittle in nature; and the natural beauty and contrasts obtained by mixing different woods.