Nov 112009
 

Here’s an unglassed version of the single fin I’ve just finished.

It’s looking good. All that remains is too tweak the rails and add a pin line. Many thanks to my friend Byron Loker who did some hard yards on sanding the deck, bottom and rails. He has done a great job, with a fine eye for the detail.

The interesting thing about this board is that the inside skeleton is made from old foam. The wood is Oregon pine cut from an old door frame and locally-grown Saligna Gum that I had lying around from the first board I made back in the beginning of 2008.

Photo: Byron Loker. I like the composure and the colours.

Sep 182009
 

Wood is such a beautiful medium to work with. So far I’ve experimented with Saligna gum, Meranti, Obeche and Jelutong, but this 5.9 fish made out of Oregon pine is in my opinion by far the most beautiful. Part of the reason why its been so satisfying to make this board is that it is 100% recycled wood – all the Oregon on this board came from old pieces of floorboard and in parts you can still see the holes were the nails were. I think its awesome to take something old and turn it into something beautiful – and the bonus is that the board really surfs well.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the best type of wood to use in making surfboards. It seems to me the two main factors that you want to consider is weight, although the technique you use for building the boards can allow you to experiment with different varieties; flexibility in that this has performance implications and you don’t want to be working with wood that is too brittle in nature; and the natural beauty and contrasts obtained by mixing different woods.

Sep 172009
 

Second session on the fish was a blast. So stoked. Three to four foot waves and I don’t think I’ve ever done so many floaters and re-entries in a session. The board totally exceeded my expectations, generating so much speed over the face and seeming to have its own instinct to finding the lip. Bring it on.

Photo: Byron Loker

Sep 162009
 

So I finished sanding the glassing on the hollow wooden fish surfboard pictured here on the weekend. It’s a 5.9 twin fin and I got to surf it for the first time on Monday at a gnarly left reef. It was coming through about six foot and very washy, but I was stoked with how it came together. Made some critical drops and the board held its line bottom turning out of the bowl. Even managed a few turns on the choppy wave face, so the potential looks to be there. Amped for the next session. (That’s my four-year-old son holding up the woodwork by the way.) Picture courtesy of Byron Loker.

So I finished sanding the glassing on the hollow wooden fish surfboard pictured here on the weekend. It’s a 5.9 twin fin and I got to surf it for the first time on Monday at a gnarly left reef. It was coming through about six foot and very washy, but I was stoked with how it came together. Made some critical drops and the board held its line bottom turning out of the bowl. Even managed a few turns on the choppy wave face, so the potential looks to be there. Amped for the next session. (That’s my four-year-old son holding up the woodwork by the way.) Picture courtesy of my good mate Byron Loker.