Oct 012009
 

The latest board on the table in the workshop is a 6.0 single fin, thick in the top third, narrowing to a pin tail. It’s coming together quickly because I’ve had a lot of time the last week and I’m hoping to have it ready for sanding by the weekend.

The board pictured here is the second board I made, dating back to early 2008. The one I’m making now is based on similar dimensions, but represents the fourth generation of the model.

There’s an interesting variation on this one, which is an experiment using recycled foam to build the inside framework. So far it’s going okay, but it is a bit of an experiment and I’m making it up as I go along. What I have noticed is that foam isn’t that strong under clamping so you have to be careful not to crush it.

For the rest of it, I’m using recycled pieces of Oregon pine mixed with some old planks of locally-grown South African Saligna gum. I wasn’t sure how the two varieties would match up, but seeing them together I think the board is going to look stunning. Can’t wait to get it in the water, although this one is going to a friend. It’s going to be hard to give away, but hopefully he’ll let me surf it.

Photo: Byron Loker

The latest board on the table in the workshop is a 6.0 single fin, thick in the top third, narrowing to a pin tail. It’s coming together quickly because I’ve had a lot of time the last week and I’m hoping to have it ready for sanding by the weekend. Gonna call this one Ndawu Yama Phupa, which is Xhosa for Place of Dreaming and is a lesser known name for Supertubes at Jeffrey’s Bay. Reckon the shape of this board is made for Supers.The board pictured here is the second board I made, dating back to early 2008. The one I’m making now is based on similar dimensions, but represents the fourth generation of the model.There’s an interesting variation on this one, which is an experiment using recycled foam to build the inside framework. So far it’s going okay, but it is a bit of an experiment and I’m making it up as I go along. What I have noticed is that foam isn’t that strong under clamping so you have to be careful not to crush it.

For the rest of it, I’m using recycled pieces of Oregon pine mixed with some old planks of locally-grown South African Saligna gum. I wasn’t sure how the two varieties would match up, but seeing them together I think the board is going to look stunning. Can’t wait to get it in the water, although this one is going to a friend. It’s going to be hard to give away, but hopefully he’ll let me surf it.

Photo: Byron LokerPlace of

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