Dec 052016
 

The 2017 hollow wooden surfboard course dates are out. You can view them below and there is also more information available on the courses page of this website. You can also scroll down to see some of the pictures of the surfboards built over the last four years.

In 2016, I held courses in Scarborough, Cape Town, Cape St. Francis and Durban. In 2017 I’ll be doing the same in an effort to make the courses more accessible to people around the country.

Please contact me on on 073 232 3043 if you have any questions, or email me on burnett.patrick@gmail.com

2017 COURSE SCHEDULE

16-20 January 2017:  The first hollow wooden surfboard building workshop of 2017 will take place in the Scarborough workshop. Build your wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own stand-up paddleboard over six days.
  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane in one day.

20-25 February 2017: Burnett Wood Surfboards will be hosting a workshop in the Cape St. Francis/J-Bay area. Build your wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

6-10 March 2017: This course will be held in Woodstock, close to central Cape Town and the Northern Suburbs. Build your wooden surfboard over six or three days, or book in after work for an evening build. If you can’t make these dates, book in to build a board at the Scarborough workshop in March. Choose the dates that suit you, and choose whether to build your beautiful wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own stand-up paddleboard over six days.
  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

17-22 April 2017: Durban Calling. After a successful 2016 course in Durban, Burnett Wood Surfboards will be back over these dates. Build your wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

May 2017: This is an as-you-can-make-it, book-your-own-dates month at the Scarborough workshop. Choose the dates that suit you, and choose whether to build your beautiful wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own stand-up paddleboard over six days.
  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

21-26 August 2017: The course will be held in Woodstock, close to central Cape Town and the Northern Suburbs. Build your wooden surfboard over six or three days, or book in after work for an evening build.

18-23 September 2017: This course will take place in the Scarborough workshop. If you can’t make these dates, book in to build a during the dates that suit you, and choose whether to build your beautiful wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own stand-up paddleboard over six days.
  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

20-25 November 2017: This course will take place in the Scarborough workshop. If you can’t make these dates, book in to build a during the dates that suit you, and choose whether to build your beautiful wooden surfboard over six or three days.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own stand-up paddleboard over six days.
  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

4-9 December 2017: This course will take place in the Scarborough workshop.

Other course options available are:

  • Build-your-own bodysurfing hand plane over one day.

COURSE PICTURE GALLERY

Course Pictures and Boards

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Nov 102016
 

fishI’ll be in Cape Town central for a wood surfboard building course between 21-26 November. There will be a daytime build option, but also an evening option between 6-9pm every evening for those who work.

The final course for 2016 takes place from 5-10 December in Scarborough.

Those participating walk away from the course with their own handcrafted and very beautiful hollow wood surfboard. Have a look at this gallery to see some of the beautiful boards that have been made on courses that I’ve held.

Our wooden surfboard course takes builders through all the theoretical and practical aspects of building a wood surfboard. We look at the different types of timber, the environmental aspects and the design dynamics underpinning wood surfboards. This is combined with the practical process of crafting a surfboard from a pile of planks into a one-of-a-kind work of art that can be surfed. More information can be found here, or email Patrick at burnett.patrick@gmail.com

StFrancisCourseIMG_6125

Nov 012016
 
wooden surfboards

Matthew Kramer styles the light fantastic on his wooden surfboard. Photo: Lee-Anne Curtis-Cox

Matthew Kramer was a participant of the first wooden surfboards course that I ran in 2013. Earlier this year I caught up with him for a surf – he subsequently wrote a very articulate account of what his wooden surfboard had meant to him over the years. It was published on Wavescape and I’m re-publishing it below. Thanks to Lee-Anne Curtis-Cox from Capture the Moment for the stunning pictures.

“When I paddled out at Llandudno for one of the first sessions on my freshly built wood surfboard I threw the board down onto the water in the shallows, slid onto it and started paddling, half expecting it to sink. It didn’t. In fact, it paddled nicely, the extra weight of the board making it glide swiftly and smoothly through the water.

I spotted Robby McDonald from Vudu Surf in the lineup and as I paddled over he turned to me and with his usual effortless wit called out, “What’s that you’re riding boetie, the old front door?” We had a good chuckle and pretty soon after that our attention was pulled back to the ocean and the task of catching some waves.

Since that day the “old front door” has had a remarkable impact on my world. I am constantly amazed and inspired by what this wood board can handle and what it can do. I’ve ridden this one board in a variety of conditions from mushy one foot Muizenberg to pumping Llands barrels and I have yet to find the limits of where it can work and bring me joy.

wooden surfboards

“What I have learned from this wood board, apart from a better bottom turn, is that although there are limits to what we can do in this life there are options and sometimes the smallest decision can have a powerful effect.” Photo: Lee-Anne Curtis-Cox

I built the board on a course with Patrick from Burnett Wood Surfboards and the experience of building my own board and then riding it is a huge component of the profound effect I have felt. I cannot recommend building your own surf craft highly enough and I feel it is something every surfer should do at least once.

Riding this board makes me feel I have earned my place in the sea. I feel initiated. I know the cost and the impact of getting to ride the wave. I know what’s inside this thing, just how much effort, love and attention to detail is engrained in its make up, and I’m going to take a great deal of care to ensure that it stays with me as long as possible. I also know that am going to make another one.

Like most surfers, I’ve ridden commercially produced surfboards most of my life and I’ve loved it. Surfing is a gift no matter how it comes to you. I think if everybody surfed there’d be a lot less road rage and nasty business out there. Who would want to be dropping bombs or delivering hurt when there’s a crisp offshore wind and the waves are perfect and you just know there’s a few with your name on them? Well I know what I would choose. I’ve ridden foam and fibreglass boards most of my life.

In fact in recent years I’ve been going through them at a rate. I ride them until they are finished, they reach a point where they will snap repeatedly and at that point it becomes cheaper to buy a new board and not have to keep paying for repairs. But every time I send another board to landfill I feel regret, not for the loss of a board but because I know that I am contributing to the mountain of toxic crap that is bleeding into the earth, poisoning and degrading our biosphere.

As wave riders we are ocean lovers by default. I have a love for the ocean that goes way deeper than just appreciating what it offers me as a surfer. That is something that most water men and women will understand.

The ocean offers us a very tangible and visible example of an ecosystem as a singular entity. The ocean lives, breathes, shifts and changes constantly just like any other organism. It’s easy to see it as a living being and I want to treat it as I would any other living creature, with the respect that it deserves. For me that means being mindful of my relationship with the ocean – what impact it is having and how I can work to better that relationship.

I understand that my actions alone will change very little in this world and any way, I’m over wanting to change it. I’m reminded of a classic line from Detective Velcoro, “My strong suspicion is that we get the world we deserve.”

I believe that Mother Nature will balance the scales one way or another with or without our help. For my part the question is, “what am I going to do to make it all OK for myself today?” And today the answer to that question is to engage in what I love with honor, respect and dignity. I’m putting that toxic shit behind me. I’ll use it where I have to, where I have no choice, but I’ll always be looking for an alternative.

And for now that’s good enough for me, knowing that the blind and unconscious use of disposable, poisonous crap for the sake of convenience is in the past.

I’m not a professional surfer. As far as my value system is concerned I now see that it is more important for me to ride a board that is made from materials that are biodegradable and non toxic than it is to shave five hundred grams from the final weight of my board. In the choice of saving five hundred Rands today versus five hundred years of leaching toxic chemicals into land and sea there is no choice. Besides, I’ve seen more improvement in my surfing while riding my wood board than any performance board I’ve ever had.

What I have learned from this wood board, apart from a better bottom turn, is that although there are limits to what we can do in this life there are options and sometimes the smallest decision can have a powerful effect. I am connected to the the ocean. I am a part of something greater than myself, and I now see that we can only truly care for something when we are a part of it.

It took building and riding a wooden surfboard for me to understand that.”

Oct 092016
 

wooden surfboard courseLast week I was in my workshop in Cape Point, near the southern most point of Africa. By the weekend I was in another hemisphere, in Farnborough, somewhere south-east of London. The mission was to shape a hollow wooden surfboard at the Triton Tools stand at the ScrewFix Live exhibition being held Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Farnborough Exhibition Centre.

The event was packed solid for three days. Meeting and talking to so many people about wooden surfboards and my wooden surfboard course offering was really exciting. It was great to meet so many UK surfers who were interested in the boards. Surfers are obviously interested in wooden surfboards and how they are made, but what I also find fascinating is how non-surfers relate to them and are intrigued by the way they are made, the time that it takes and the craft that goes into them.

I’ve found that they are a great wooden surfboard courseconversation starter for anyone that works with wood on any level, and I’ve certainly learnt a lot from people who make other things and are willing to share their experiences.

Great news for anyone in the UK is that Triton Tools are running a competition where people can sign up to be in line to win a trip to South Africa to attend a course with me where they will build their own eco-friendly hollow wooden surfboard. It’s an amazing prize so if you’re a surfer in the UK, or even just interested in surfing and how to make your own wooden surfboard, keep an eye on the Triton Tools website and this website. The competition is currently being promoted at their UK shows but will also be posted on their website in the coming weeks.

 

 

 

Sep 122016
 

In 2015, I was very fortunate to have an incredibly talented group of photographers and editors make a short video about what I do at Burnett Wood Surfboards. The film contains some beautiful images of the land and ocean around where my workshop is in Cape Town, and it’s a story about the journey from making wooden boards in the workshop to intimately engaging with the cold Atlantic here on the southern tip of the great continent of Africa. Check out the video below:


 

 

Jul 302016
 
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These guys built their boards in Scarborough. Now there’s a Cape Town option in August with evening and full day courses.

The next hollow wood surfboard building course that I’m running takes place from 22-27 August 2016 in Cape Town CBD.

For those who work and can’t take time off, this course has an evening option where building takes place from 6-9pm.

The full time day course runs from Monday to Friday/Saturday.

Check out this web page for more information or email Patrick on burnett.patrick@gmail.com to book your place.

Jul 262016
 

IMG-20160623-WA0006This was probably my favourite board of all time. Ok, it’s hard to say that, so let’s put it in the top 3. It was an 11′ hollow wooden gun made out of South African grown redwood, from the Californian redwood species. The British apparently planted redwood in South Africa for ship building, back when they colonised the southern tip of Africa. I’m glad they did because it enabled me to make this board. It was bought by a German guy and has been shipped to Europe.

 

 

 

IMG-20160612-WA0001Burnett Wood Surfboards (and son) missioned down to Muizenberg where the Logjam invitational took place. As part of the event the organisers held a wooden surfboard heat, which wasn’t really a heat, but just a free surf. The waves weren’t great, but it was good to see all the wooden surfboards on display and see some of the folk that I’ve bumped into over the years.

 

 

 

Minimal_BantryBay

This was a 7′.6″ mini-mal that I made for a guy who walked into my workshop on a Sunday afternoon. I was just shutting up shop so we could easily have missed each other, and he was going back to the U.S. the next day. I like the tones of the wood and the shape is always a favourite of mine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG-20160604-WA0002This was a 9′.7″ hollow wooden longboard made out of redwood. The client wanted a really natural look, with lots of swirl and knots. I spent a few hours scratching around the wood pile to find the beautiful pieces on the bottom of this board. Pictured with me is my youngest son Noah, who often comes to the workshop with me, where he likes to saw and bang making bows and arrows and swords (no surfboards yet).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7036.And finally, a 5′.7″ fish in Western Red Cedar and Obeche, with mother-of-pearl inserts on the bottom. I don’t often do these decorative type boards, but quite enjoy doing something different every now and then.

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Jul 182016
 
StFrancisCourse

The crew from the Cape St. Francis course.

Shew. The last few months have been a ride, that’s for sure. I’ve been on the road to Durban and Cape St. Francis where I have run hollow wood surfboard courses for stoked surfers, building some beautiful boards and making new friends along the way. There’s been a stack of custom orders. Export licence bureaucracy dealings. A case of flu that wouldn’t go away that caused havoc with delivery times. A torn hamstring that’s seen me hobbling around like an old man. Less surfing than is normal for this time of year, given that it’s the middle of winter in Cape Town.

I first visited Cape St. Francis as a stoked grom many years ago and was taken in by it’s mellow vibe and decent, uncrowded waves (compared to the scrum of J-Bay up the road, that is). On my latest visit, I was pleased to find that nothing much has changed. It’s a surf town through and through, and everyone seems to have some sort of connection to the ocean. Everything is within a few minutes of everything else. The week I spent there saw two big cold fronts smash through, with strong winds, heavy rains and big swell. Being from Cape Town I’m used to the cold, but the wind chill factor on a dawn patrol at an Eastern Cape point is enough to send you sprinting for a hot shower, that’s for sure.

IMG-20160701-WA0003On a Friday evening, I sat in my car with heater running watching a famous and rarely surfed point show signs of life as it broke into a 35 knot south-wester that was accompanied by heavy rain squalls. It’s a spot that’s been on my radar for a long time and I’ve been wanting to surf it on a solid swell. It looked like it was going to be on the next morning and dodgy hamstring or not, I was going to be out there at first light. Off to bed.

When I awoke in the morning the wind had dropped and conditions looked good. Wetsuit on in the bedroom and grabbed my 8′.6″ hollow wood gun. But as soon as I got into the parking lot and saw the ocean I knew it wasn’t going to happen. You can see when the ocean is surging on a big swell and it had been doing that on the Friday evening, but by the morning it had settled down. There was still big swell marching past out to sea, but it wasn’t going to turn on for that special place. That’s just the way it goes sometimes.

A busy two months is out of the way and my dream of establishing hollow wood surfboard courses in other parts of the country has liftoff! Thanks so much to all who participated. There’ll be more courses in Cape St. Francis and Durban later in the year so email me on burnet.patrick@gmail.com for more info.

Now for some winter, please! Enjoy yours!

 

 

 Posted by at 8:17 pm
Jun 132016
 
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Three of the four guys on the Durban course with the boards that they built.

At 4am on a Saturday morning two weeks ago, my car jam-packed with everything needed to run a wooden surfboard course for four guys, I set out from Cape Town to make the 1,700km drive to Durban.

Plan A had been to take a slow drive up the East Coast over several days, stopping along the way to surf. Vic Bay. Seals. J-Bay. Plan A didn’t even get off the table due to work commitments, family and the like. Plan B kicked in: pack the hell up and brave the deep Karoo road to Durban via Bloemfontein. It’s not often that I venture away from the sea. Only in emergencies.

I was thrilled to be travelling to Durban, however, to share the stoke of wooden surfboard building. When I first started offering courses, there were a few guys from Durban who got in touch asking me to hold a course in South Africa’s surf capital. Why not? Surfing is so much about the crazy things; taking a chance on a surf trip, daring a late drop, not knowing what is going to happen and how things are going to work out. And this trip had the feel of a crazy surf trip, even through I was in the middle of the Karoo.

Durban was lush. Rolling green hills, thick green forests and sparkling ocean. For winter, it’s like a warm bath during the day, with a shot from the cold water tap in the morning and evening. Shorts and a t-shirt.

Meeting Sean, Pat, Jason and Sam on the Monday morning I knew we were going to have a great week. Everyone, including myself was wide-eyed keen as we began building the four boards for the week, a longboard and three fish. I love watching guys put their boards together and see their appreciation for the shape they’re making grow, and their sense of ownership over what they’re doing unfold. It’s a real privilege.

I hadn’t planned to surf, but the crew took pity on me and Sean took me down to the beach for a baggie session just before I began the long drive home. What a treat. Warm water, golden beaches, hills covered in greenery, clear water. The stoke from that surf got me all the way to land-locked Bethlehem on the drive home, 500km from Durban in the Free State. That only left 1200km to drive the next day.

Apr 252016
 

wood surfboard workshopIn a five-night evening workshop last week, four stoked guys built four beautiful hollow wooden surfboards in a Burnett Wood Surfboards pop-up wooden surfboard building workshop.

Working out of the graffiti-covered PopUp Gallery in Frere Street Woodstock, we started at 6pm every evening and finished up by 9pm. The boards started out as a pile of planks, but by the time Friday came around had been made into three fish and one longboard. We used locally grown wood and bio-resin, making these the most sustainable surfboards available on the market today.

It’s now back to our regular full-time workshop in Scarborough, but we’ll be back in Cape Town central for another evening course over the dates 22-27 August 2016. Evening courses mean no leave from work, so if you’re keen to sign up then drop me an email on burnett.patrick@gmail.com or call me on 073 232 3043. For more information, you can also have a look at the courses page on this website.

Standby for pictures of the finished boards from the workshop as they begin to come out of the glassing process.